Moore County Boy Scouts of North Carolina
            Serving Moore County for 14 Years and Counting
                     
 
About this site Contact Webmaster/Owner Search Site Site Map
Join scouting Awards Youth & Adult Chaplain Cub Day Camp Cubmaster.org Cub Scout Crafts Pine Wood Derby Leave No Trace Uniform Inspection Scout Shops
Join Scouting Awards Youth & Adult Scouting's Knots Awards Listings Boys' Life Magazine Chaplain Eagle Scouts BSA Field book online Natisihi Chapter (OA) NESA Scouting Forms Scouting Digest Scout Shops Scouting Magazine Scholarships Order of the Arrow Merit badge Uniform Inspection Woods of Wisdom
Awards Comm. Commissioners forms Commissioner's Cup Award Other Scout Froms Manuals Netcommish.com Resources Podcast Scout Shops Online Commissioner
Awards Youth & Adult Knots Awards Listings MyScouting Training 2008 - 2010 Training Terms Training Homepage Youth Protection online
Camping Guide Ceremony Crafts God and Country awards Propane Q / A Recipes Halloween Guide NC High Adventure Base Disabilities / Special Needs Scout Art Scout Forms Songs Scout Shops Skits Weather Woods of Wisdom
What is Venturing High adventure National Venturing Youth Cabinet Southern Region Scholarships

Click for Southern Pines, North Carolina Forecast















KidZui.com
 

Join cub scouts and boys scouts in Moore County, North Carolina
To make a difference in a boy's life.



Garfield the spokes cat of scouting.
More information Contact
What is Scouting?

What is Cub Scouting?
 (5-10 ages)
  • Tiger Cubs (1 graders)
  • Wolf Cub (2 graders)
  • Bear Cub (3 graders)
  • Webelos (4 & 5 graders)


  • What is Boy Scouting
     (10-17 ages)

    What is Venturing

     (14-20 ages)

    When was scouting started
    Facts about scouting
    Volunteers and New leaders
    Where can I find a scout unit at
    Cub scouts, Boy scouts (Location Only)

    What is the local number for scouting

    Local
    (910) 695-7252
    Southern Pines, NC


    Council
    1-800-662-7102
    Raleigh, NC


    Webmaster
    bsapackman@hotmail.com




















    What is scouting?

    The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship, and personal fitness training for youth.

    Specifically, the BSA endeavors to develop American citizens who are physically, mentally, and emotionally fit; have a high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage, and resourcefulness; have personal values based on religious concepts; have the desire and skills to help others; understand the principles of the American social, economic, and governmental systems; are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation's role in the world; have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people; and are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.

    Boy Scouting, one of three membership divisions of the BSA (the others are Cub Scouting and Venturing), is available to boys who have earned the Arrow of Light Award or have completed the fifth grade, or who are 11 through 17 years old, and subscribe to the Scout Oath and Law. The program achieves the BSA's objectives of developing character, citizenship, and personal fitness qualities among youth by focusing on a vigorous program of outdoor activities. What are the facts about scouting as a whole. More information go here.

    More information Contact
    What is Cub scouting?
    (5-10 ages)

  • Tiger Cubs  ( 1 Graders)
  • Wolf Cub Scouts  ( 2 Graders)
  • Bear Cub Scouts  ( 3 Graders)
  • Webelos Scouts  ( 4 and 5 Graders)


  • what is Boy scouting

    (10-17 ages)

    what is Venturing scouting

    (14-20 ages CO ed)
    Where can I find a scout unit at
    cub scouts, boy scouts (location only)

    What is the local number for scouting

    Local
    695-7252
    Southern Pines, NC

    Council

    1-800-662-7102 Raleigh, NC
    The number you see on here is NOT the webmaster if need to get up with the webmaster send a email.
    When was scouting started

        Scouting, as known to millions of youth and adults, evolved during the early 1900s through the efforts of several men dedicated to bettering youth. These pioneers of the program conceived outdoor activities that developed skills in young boys and gave them a sense of enjoyment, fellowship, and a code of conduct for everyday living.

    In this country and abroad at the turn of the century, it was thought that children needed certain kinds of education that the schools couldn't or didn't provide. This led to the formation of a variety of youth groups, many with the word "Scout" in their names. For example, Ernest Thompson Seton, an American naturalist, artist, writer, and lecturer, originated a group called the Woodcraft Indians and in 1902 wrote a guidebook for boys in his organization called the Birch Bark Roll. Meanwhile in Britain, Robert Baden-Powell, after returning to his country a hero following military service in Africa, found boys reading the manual he had written for his regiment on stalking and survival in the wild. Gathering ideas from Seton, America 's Daniel Carter Beard, and other Scout craft experts, Baden-Powell rewrote his manual as a nonmilitary skill book, which he titled Scouting for Boys. The book rapidly gained a wide readership in England and soon became popular in the United States . In 1907, when Baden-Powell held the first camp out for Scouts on Brownsea Island off the coast of England, troops were spontaneously springing up in America .

    William D. Boyce, a Chicago publisher, incorporated the Boy Scouts of America in 1910 after meeting with Baden-Powell. (Boyce was inspired to meet with the British founder by an unknown Scout who led him out of a dense London fog and refused to take a tip for doing a Good Turn.) Immediately after its incorporation, the BSA was assisted by officers of the YMCA in organizing a task force to help community organizations start and maintain a high-quality Scouting program. Those efforts climaxed in the organization of the nation's first Scout camp at Lake George, New York, directed by Ernest Thompson Seton. Beard, who had established another youth group, the Sons of Daniel Boone (which he later merged with the BSA), provided assistance.Also on hand for this historic event was James E. West, a lawyer and an advocate of children's rights, who later would become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America. Seton became the first volunteer national Chief Scout, and Beard, the first national Scout Commissioner.

    What Is Cub Scouting?top of the page

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

    Scout Oath    Scout Law
    On my honor I will do my best
    To do my duty to God and my country
    and to obey the Scout Law;
    To help other people at all times;
    To keep myself physically strong,
    mentally awake, and morally straight.
      A Scout is:
    Trustworthy
    Loyal
    Helpful
    Friendly
    Courteous
    Kind
      Obedient
    Cheerful
    Thrifty
    Brave
    Clean
    Reverent

    Vision Statement

    The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.

    In the future Scouting will continue to

    • Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;
    • Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law;
    • Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;
    • Serve America's communities and families with its quality, values-based program.

    Badges of
    Cub Scouting

    Tiger Cubs
    Tiger Cubs

    Bobcat - First Rank
    Bobcat
    First Rank

    Wolf
    Wolf

    Bear
    Bear

    Webelos
    Webelos

    Arrow of Light
    Arrow of Light
    Cub Scouting's
    highest award

    The Purposes of Cub Scouting

    Since 1930, the Boy Scouts of America has helped younger boys through Cub Scouting. It is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age). Parents, leaders, and organizations work together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA's three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

    The ten purposes of Cub Scouting are:

    1. Character Development
    2. Spiritual Growth
    3. Good Citizenship
    4. Sportsmanship and Fitness
    5. Family Understanding
    6. Respectful Relationships
    7. Personal Achievement
    8. Friendly Service
    9. Fun and Adventure
    10. Preparation for Boy Scouts

    Membership

    Cub Scouting members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. Tiger Cubs (first-graders), Wolf Cub Scouts (second graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third graders), and Webelos Scouts (fourth and fifth graders) meet weekly.

    Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

     

     

    Volunteer Leadership

    Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Cub Scout program. They serve in a variety of positions, as everything from unit leaders to pack committee chairmen, committee members, den leaders, and chartered organization representatives.

    Like other phases of the Scouting program, a Cub Scout pack belongs to an organization with interests similar to those of the BSA. This organization, which might be a church, school, community organization, or group of interest citizens, is chartered by the BSA to use the Scouting program. This chartered organization provides a suitable meeting place, adult leadership, supervision,and opportunities for a healthy Scouting life for the boys under its care. Each organization appoints one of its members as a chartered organization representative. The organization, through the pack committee, is responsible for providing leadership,the meeting place, and support materials for pack activities.

    The new Criminal Background Screening will be conducted on all new adult volunteers in the traditional Scouting program. More information

    Advancement Plan

    Recognition is important to young boys. The Cub Scout advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn badges, and strengthens family understanding as adult family members work with boys on advancement projects.

    Tiger Cub. The Tiger Cub program is for first grade (or age 7) boys and their adult partners. There are five Tiger Cub achievement areas. The Tiger Cub, working with his adult partner, completes 15 requirements within these areas to earn the Tiger Cub Badge. These requirements consist of an exciting series of indoor and outdoor activities just right for a boy in the first grade.

    Bobcat. The Bobcat rank is for all boys who join Cub Scouting.

    Wolf. The Wolf program is for boys who have completed first grade (or are age 8). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass twelve achievements involving simple physical and mental skills.

    Bear. The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade (or are age 9). There are 24 Bear achievements in four categories. The Cub Scout must complete 12 of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are somewhat more difficult and challenging than those for Wolf rank.

    Webelos. This program is for boys who have completed third grade (or are age 10). A boy may begin working on the Webelos badge as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Scout Book, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements—all leading to the Arrow of Light Award.

    Activities

    Cub Scouting means "doing." Everything in Cub Scouting is designed to have the boys doing things. Activities are used to achieve the aims of Scouting—citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness.

    Many of the activities happen right in the den and pack. The most important are the weekly den meetings and the monthly pack meetings.

    Cub Scout Academics and Sports

    The Cub Scout Academics and Sports program provides the opportunity for boys to learn new techniques, increase scholarship skills, develop sportsmanship, and have fun. Participation in the program allows boys to be recognized for physical fitness and talent-building activities.

    Camping

    Age-appropriate camping programs are packed with theme-oriented action that brings Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts into the world of imagination. Day camping comes to the boy in neighborhoods across the country; resident camping is at least a three-day experience in which Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp within a developed theme of adventure and excitement. "Cub Scout Worlds" are used by many councils to carry the world of imagination into reality with actual theme structures of castles, forts, ships, etc. Cub Scout pack members enjoy camping in local council camps and other council-approved campsites. Camping programs combine fun and excitement with doing one's best, getting along with others, and developing an appreciation for ecology and the world of the outdoors.

    Publications

    Volunteers are informed of national news and events through Scouting magazine (circulation 900,000). Boys may subscribe to Boys' Life magazine (circulation 1.3 million). Both are published by the Boy Scouts of America. Also available are a number of Cub Scout and leader publications, including the Tiger Cub Handbook, Wolf Cub Scout Book, Bear Cub Scout Book, Webelos Scout Book, Cub Scout Leader Book , Cub Scout Program Helps, and Webelos Leader Guide.

    Cub Scouting Ideals

    Apart from the fun and excitement of Cub Scout activities, the Cub Scout Promise, the Law of the Pack, the Tiger Cub motto, and the Cub Scout sign, handshake, motto, and salute all teach good citizenship and contribute to a boy's sense of belonging.

    Cub Scout Promise

    I, (name), promise to do my best To do my duty to God and my country, To help other people, and To obey the Law of the Pack.

    Cub Scout Motto

    Do Your Best.

    Tiger Cub Motto

    Search, Discover, Share.

    Law of the Pack

    The Cub Scout follows Akela. The Cub Scout helps the pack go. The pack helps the Cub Scout grow. The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

    Colors

    The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold. They have special meaning, which will help boys see beyond the fun of Cub Scouting to its ultimate goals.

    The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness.


    What Is Boy Scouting?top of the page

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

    Scout Oath      Scout Law
    On my honor I will do my best
    To do my duty to God and my country
    and to obey the Scout Law;
    To help other people at all times;
    To keep myself physically strong,
    mentally awake, and morally straight.
         A Scout is:
    Trustworthy
    Loyal
    Helpful
    Friendly
    Courteous
    Kind
      Obedient
    Cheerful
    Thrifty
    Brave
    Clean
    Reverent

    Vision Statement

    The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.

    In the future Scouting will continue to

    • Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;
    • Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law;
    • Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;
    • Serve America's communities and families with its quality, values-based program.
    ADVANCEMENT RANKS

    Tenderfoot
    Tenderfoot

    Second Class
    Second Class

    First  class
    First Class

    Star Rank
    Star

    Life Rank
    Life

    Eagle scout the highest award in scouting
    Eagle

    Purpose of the BSA

    The Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship, and personal fitness training for youth.

    Specifically, the BSA endeavors to develop American citizens who are physically, mentally, and emotionally fit; have a high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage, and resourcefulness; have personal values based on religious concepts; have the desire and skills to help others; understand the principles of the American social, economic, and governmental systems; are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation's role in the world; have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people; and are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.

    Boy Scout Program Membership

    Boy Scouting, one of the traditional membership divisions of the BSA, is available to boys who have earned the Arrow of Light Award or have completed the fifth grade, or who are 11 through 17 years old . The program achieves the BSA's objectives of developing character, citizenship, and personal fitness qualities among youth by focusing on a vigorous program of outdoor activities.

    Volunteer Scouters

    Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Boy Scouting program. They serve in a variety of jobs—everything from unit leaders to chairmen of troop committees, committee members, merit badge counselors, and chartered organization representatives.

    Like other phases of the program, Boy Scouting is made available to community organizations having similar interests and goals. Chartered organizations include professional organizations; governmental bodies; and religious, educational, civic, fraternal, business, labor, and citizens' groups. Each organization appoints one of its members as the chartered organization representative. The organization is responsible for leadership, the meeting place, and support for troop activities.

    The new Criminal Background Screening will be conducted on all new adult volunteers in the traditional Scouting program. More information

    Aims and Methods of the Scouting Program

    The Scouting program has three specific objectives, commonly referred to as the "Aims of Scouting." They are character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness.

    The methods by which the aims are achieved are listed below in random order to emphasize the equal importance of each.

    Ideals
    The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. The Boy Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what and who he becomes.
    Patrols
    The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where members can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through elected representatives.
    Outdoor Programs
    Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. In the outdoors the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for the beauty of the world around us. The outdoors is the laboratory in which Boy Scouts learn ecology and practice conservation of nature's resources.
    Advancement
    Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Boy Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others.
    Associations With Adults
    Boys learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of the troop. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to boys, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives.
    Personal Growth
    As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting's aims.
    Leadership Development
    The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership role of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.
    Uniform
    The uniform makes the Boy Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Boy Scout's commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Boy Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. The uniform is practical attire for Boy Scout activities and provides a way for Boy Scouts to wear the badges that show what they have accomplished.

    Outdoor Activities

    Local councils operate and maintain Scout camps. The National Council operates high-adventure areas at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, the Northern Tier National High Adventure Program in Minnesota and Canada, and the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base in the Florida Keys . About 70 councils also operate high-adventure programs.

    The BSA conducts a national Scout jamboree every four years and participates in world Scout jamborees (also held at four-year intervals). Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, was the site of the 2001 National Scout Jamboree.

    Publications

    The BSA publishes the Boy Scout Handbook (more than 37 million copies of which have been printed); the Patrol Leader Handbook, which offers information relevant to boy leadership; the Scoutmaster Handbook; more than 100 merit badge pamphlets dealing with hobbies, vocations, and advanced Scoutcraft; and program features and various kinds of training, administrative, and organizational manuals for adult volunteer leaders and Boy Scouts. In addition, the BSA publishes Boys' Life magazine, the national magazine for all boys (magazine circulation is more than 1.3 million) and Scouting magazine for volunteers, which has a circulation of 900,000.

    Conservation

    Conservation activities supplement the program of Boy Scout advancement, summer camp, and outdoor activities and teaches young people to better understand their interdependence with the environment.

    What Is Venturing?top of the page

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

    Scout Oath    Scout Law
    On my honor I will do my best
    To do my duty to God and my country
    and to obey the Scout Law;
    To help other people at all times;
    To keep myself physically strong,
    mentally awake, and morally straight.
      A Scout is:
    Trustworthy
    Loyal
    Helpful
    Friendly
    Courteous
    Kind
      Obedient
    Cheerful
    Thrifty
    Brave
    Clean
    Reverent

    Vision Statement

    The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.

    In the future Scouting will continue to

    • Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;
    • Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law;
    • Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;
    • Serve America's communities and families with its quality, values-based program.

    Program

    Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age.

    Venturing's purpose is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults.

    Venturing is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth, adult leaders, and organizations in their communities. Local community organizations establish a Venturing crew by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of exciting and meaningful activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow, develop leadership skills, and become good citizens.

    Goals

    Young adults involved in Venturing will ...

    • Learn to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling the values in the Venturing Oath and Code
    • Experience a program that is fun and full of challenge and adventure
    • Become a skilled, training and program resource for Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts and other groups
    • Acquire skills in the areas of high adventure, sports, arts and hobbies, religious life, or Sea Scouting
    • Experience positive leadership from adult and youth leaders and be given opportunities to take on leadership roles
    • Have a chance to learn and grow in a supportive, caring, and fun environment

    Methods

    The methods of Venturing have been carefully chosen to meet the needs of young adults.

    Leadership All Ventures are given opportunities to learn and apply proven leadership skills. A Venturing crew is led by elected crew officers. The Venturing Leadership Skills Course is designed for all Ventures and helps teach in an active way to effectively lead.

    Group Activities Venturing activities are interdependent group experiences in which success is dependent on the cooperation of all. Learning by "doing" in a group setting provides opportunities for developing new skills.

    Adult Association The youth officers lead the crew. The officers and activity chairs work closely with adult Advisors and other adult leaders in a spirit of partnership. The adults serve in a "shadow" leader capacity.

    Recognition. Recognition comes through the Venturing advancement program and through the acknowledgement of a youth's competence and ability by peers and adults.

    The Ideals. Ventures are expected to know and live by the Venturing Oath and Code. They promise to be faithful in religious duties, treasure their American heritage, to help others and to seek truth and fairness.

    High Adventure. Venturing's emphasis on high adventure helps provide team-building opportunities, new meaningful experiences, practical leadership application, and life-long memories to young adults.

    Teaching Others. All of the Venturing Awards require Ventures to teach what they have learned to others. When they teach others often, Ventures are better able to retain the skill or knowledge they taught, they gain confidence in their ability to speak and relate to others and they acquire skills that can benefit them for the rest of their lives as a hobby or occupation.

    Ethics in Action

    An important goal of Venturing is to help young adults be responsible and caring people, both now and in the future. Venturing uses "ethical controversies" to help young adults develop the ability to make responsible choices that reflect their concern for what is a risk and how it will effect others involved. Because an ethical controversy is a problem-solving situation, leaders expect young adults to employ empathy, invention, and selection when they think through their position and work toward a solution of an ethical controversy.

    Crew Activities

    What a Venturing crew does is limited only by the imagination and involvement of the adult and youth leaders and members of the crew—sail the Caribbean, produce a play, climb a mountain, teach disabled people to swim, or attend the Olympics. All these adventures and more are being done today by Venturing crews and ships across the country. All that is needed are concerned adults who are willing to share a little bit of themselves with today's youth—tomorrow's leaders.

    Starting a New Venturing Crew

    Organizing a Venturing crew is easy to do. Just follow these steps:

    1. A survey is conducted annually in community high schools to determine students' recreational, hobby, and avocation interests.
    2. A meeting is called of key people within an organization, with a Scouting representative in attendance. The representative explains the Venturing program, describes the key volunteer leader positions, and plan the recruiting of adult leaders.
    3. The crew committee and Advisors are recruited and meet with the Scouting representative. Responsibilities of adult leaders are explained. The Scouting representative also discusses program ideas and helps develop a one-year program. The crew's one-year program is reviewed and adopted.
    4. The organization's top executive writes a personal letter to each young adult selected from the survey, or identified through other recruitment efforts, and invites the youth and their parents to attend an organizational meeting. This letter is followed by a personal phone invitation from a member of the organization to each prospective youth.
    5. The first meeting is held, involving young adults, the adult committee, and selected consultants. Adult Advisors share the program plans with the new Ventures (youth) and discuss member involvement and leadership roles through the election of youth officers.

    What Youth Want

    Research has revealed these major points:

    • High school students have many vocational and vocational interests.
    • Teenagers want a broader experience that provides practical "hands-on" experience and is tailored to their cultural backgrounds.
    • Teenagers want to belong to a group that provides a "safe haven" from which to address the youth development issues that affect them. These issues include experimentation; moving from dependence to interdependence, social relationships, psychological changes and sexual maturity, and a re-evaluation of values.

    Program Support

    The Venturing Division has designed literature, audiovisuals, training, activities, and awards to support Venturing crews and ships.

    Literature and audiovisuals A variety of books, pamphlets, and videos have been developed to assist with organization, program, leadership, and activities. In particular, the Venturing Leader Manual will support leadership and planning.

    Training Venturing Leader Specific Training (for Adults), Venturing Leadership Skills Course (for youth), and monthly roundtables will be available to improve and enrich Venturing crew programs. A weeklong high-adventure skills course for Venturing Advisors called Powder Horn is available annually. The weeklong Nature of Leadership High Adventure Treks program is available from host councils across the country to teach experience-based leadership skills.

    Advancement Awards . A variety of awards are available to Ventures who accomplish specific advancement achievements. These awards include:

    • Venturing Bronze Awards
    • Venturing Gold Award
    • Venturing Silver Award
    • Venturing Ranger Award
    • Sea Scouting Quartermaster Award

    Recognition Awards . Those awards that are designed to provide recognition for youth and adults include:

    Uniforms. The BSA Supply Division offers the traditional spruce-green uniform shirt for Ventures. It is recommended that crews adopt a charcoal gray casual pant and/or backpacking-style short for their uniform. However, each crew may determine what, if any, specific uniform pants or shorts they will wear based on crew activities.

    BSA Councils . Venturing crews and ships are supported by local BSA councils, which provide staff and volunteer support, operate service centers and camps, and conduct training and activities.

    Liability Insurance . The Boy Scouts of America has liability insurance that covers leaders and organizations to which Venturing crews and shops are chartered. Accident and medical coverage are not included but are available through local BSA councils at a modest cost.

    Adult volunteers
    The new Criminal Background Screening will be conducted on all new adult volunteers in the traditional Scouting program. More information

    For additional information call.


    Bookmark To:      Digg  del.icio.us  Technorati  Blinklist  Furl  Reddit

    Site Disclaimer
    Please report any broken links.
    Nov 8, 1999 - Nov 8, 2013 14 years online
    best view at 1024 X 768 higher   Browers: IE6 and Firefox 2 Support

    Update: November 7, 2013 4:15 PM

    Designer and Owner by
    ©Copyright 1999 - 2013 bsapackman.com